ARRI Archive Workshop 2018

June 5 & 6, 2018
ISARPOST, Munich, Germany

Please join us at our 2018 Archive Workshop to catch up on all of the latest developments in the world of film archiving and restoration. There will be a technology exhibition with live demonstrations as well as a full program of restoration case studies, presentations from leading industry figures, and special screenings.

Due to the reconstruction of the ARRI movie theater, we are looking forward to welcoming you at the ISARPOST, Sonnenstraße 24–26 in Munich.

Opening Hours
Tuesday June 5th, 09:00am – 05:30pm
Wednesday June 6th, 09:00am – 04:30pm



Registration for this event is now closed.
We hope you will consider attending another ARRI event in the near future.



Technologies at the workshop

Details ARRI Archive Workshop 2018

PROGRAM

Tuesday, 5th June 2018

09:00 – 09:30    
Registration / Product Exhibition

09:30 – 09:45    
Welcome – Franz Kraus

09:45 – 10:30    
Introduction of Exhibitors

10:30 – 11:00    
Coffee Break / Product Exhibition

11:00 – 11:45    
Deutsche Kinemathek – Daniel Meiller, Franz Frank; ARRI Media – Steffen Paul
The restoration of E.A. Dupont’s silent film The Ancient Law (Das alte Gesetz, 1923)    

11:45 – 12:30    
Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Stiftung – Anke Wilkening; ARRI Media – Matteo Lepore
Digital Agfacolor Restoration of Münchhausen and Große Freiheit Nr. 7

12:30 – 13:30    
Lunch Break / Product Exhibition

13:30 – 14:00    
Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision – Tonnie van Els, Paulo Veiga de Fonseca
Digitizing and Archiving at Sound and Vision

14:00 – 14:45
Fixafilm – Lukasz Ceranka
Digital restoration economy of badly damaged films

14:45 – 15:30    
Coffee Break / Product Exhibition

15:30 – 16:05    
Joanneum Research – Peter Schallauer
Quality control for high-volume film digitization

16:05 – 17:30    
Product Exhibition



Wednesday, 6th June 2018

09:00 – 09:30    
Doors Open / Product Exhibition

09:30 – 10:30    
University of Zurich – Prof. Dr. Barbara Flückiger, Giorgio Trumpy
A multispectral approach to film scanning and reconstruction of dye fading

10:30 – 11:00    
Ngā Taonga Sound and Vision – Gareth Evans
Saving the Snows of Aorangi        

11:00 – 11:30    
Coffee Break / Product Exhibition

11:30 – 12:00    
Deutsches Filminstitut – Anke Mebold; HTW Berlin – Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Ulrich Ruedel
Undercover – retrieving the lost images of Der Kampf ums Matterhorn

12:00 – 12:35    
Cineteca National Mexico – Cesar De La Rosa Anaya, Natali Riquelme Barrios
Bridges of the Cinema – Five years of ARRISCAN at Cineteca Nacional

12:35 – 13:35    
Lunch Break / Product Exhibition

13:35 – 14:15    
Filmoteka Narodowa – Monika Supruniuk; Media Inventions – Jakub Stadnik
The Nitrofilm project. Practical solutions for digitization and restauration of optical sound on nitrate film

14:15 – 14:45    
Piql AS – Rune Bjerkestrand    
Long-term digital preservation of audio-visual assets

14:45 – 15:00    
MMK Trading / Notre Dame University – Marwan Kassis
The Lebanese war and the memory    

15:00 – 16:30    
Coffee Break / Product Exhibition

CONTENT

The restoration of E.A. Dupont’s silent film The Ancient Law
(Das alte Gesetz, 1923)

Deutsche Kinemathek – Daniel Meiller, Franz Frank; ARRI Media – Steffen Paul

Based on six different contemporary prints that were scanned in full length and combined in a complex editing process, the reconstruction of The Ancient Law has been compared with a jigsaw puzzle. It involved reassembling most of the images from two, three or more different sources. Matching these sources to give the reconstructed film a consistent appearance posed many challenges, especially for color timing. The original color process (tinting and toning) also had to be simulated digitally.


Digital Agfacolor Restoration of Münchhausen and Große Freiheit Nr. 7
Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Stiftung – Anke Wilkening;
ARRI Media – Matteo Lepore


Agfacolor was developed in Germany in the 1930s and was the first chromogenic negative- positive-process. The dyes are unstable, resulting in the prints fading to magenta. The adventure film Münchhausen (1943, Josef von Báky) and the film noir Grosse Freiheit Nr. 7 (1944/ 45, Helmut Käutner) are singular examples of these genres from the National Socialist period. Their different aesthetics and source situation created different challenges for color restoration, and pushed ARRI Media and ARRI Cinetechnik to collaborate developing advanced workflows and film restoration techniques.


Digitizing and Archiving at Sound and Vision
Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision – Tonnie van Els,
Paulo Veiga de Fonseca


An introduction to the work of Beeld en Geluid, the Netherlands’ Institute for Sound and Vision. The session will explore the whole process of digitally archiving film. It will take us from preparation, through the scanning of the film and associated audio, and on to grading, exporting, quality control and archiving.


Digital restoration economy of badly damaged films
Fixafilm – Lukasz Ceranka

The sad fact is that not all film can be saved. Digital restoration is a very expensive process, so decisions must be made about which elements to restore and which to allow to be lost. Alongside this editorial process, restorers must take decisions about which restoration artifacts are acceptable and which are not, given the constraints of time and money. And they have to ask whether it is worth spending thousands of euros to improve a film, when only a small number of specialists will be able to appreciate the difference on screen.


Quality control for high-volume film digitization
Joanneum Research – Peter Schallauer

An examination of cost-effective quality control in high-volume film digitization. The goal of archivists and restorers is to maximize the digitization quality while at the same time minimizing the costs involved. Central to this is automation, and the development and implementation of efficient workflows. The session will refer to examples from a project in which 25,000 reels of film were digitized in three years, to the highest quality control standards.


A multispectral approach to film scanning and reconstruction of dye fading
University of Zurich – Prof. Dr. Barbara Flückiger, Giorgio Trumpy

Presenting recent outcomes of the research project ERC Advanced Grant FilmColors. The team’s spectroscopic analyses of historical film colors identified the “chromatic Callier effect” that can significantly alter early film colors through digitization. The color separation of film scanners, which represents a limitation when scanning films with nonstandard dyes, is crucial to the development of techniques to improve digital reconstruction of faded film. The team is also compiling a spectral database within the Timeline of Historical Film Colors, which will help future research on film technology.


Saving the Snows of Aorangi
Ngā Taonga Sound and Vision – Gareth Evans

In late 2017 Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision archivists discovered that SNOWS OF AORANGI (1955), New Zealand's first Academy Award-nominated film, had never been preserved, and that no complete master material for the film survived. The film had to be reconstructed by compiling four picture elements, including two severely magenta-shifted 35mm prints. To restore the faded color a modified digital Desmet method was used. This case study details how, with limited resources and only three weeks to complete the project, preservation specialists were able to save a film that had almost been lost to the ravages of time.


Undercover – retrieving the lost images of Der Kampf ums Matterhorn
Deutsches Filminstitut – Anke Mebold,
HTW Berlin – Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Ulrich Ruedel


A look at the Deutsches Filminstitut’s restoration of Der Kampf ums Matterhorn (1928). The process involved many challenges, since all primary sources were considered lost. The reconstruction drew on surviving prints of foreign release versions, while the intertitles were lifted from a 16 mm small-gauge reissue version, using foreign theatrical versions as reference. The sole source for the film’s climax – a vintage Czech distribution print – had been badly damaged by earlier generations of 'restorers'. Retouching ink and paper stickers had to be analyzed and removed manually, frame-by-frame, to reveal long-obscured film images.


Bridges of the Cinema – Five years of ARRISCAN at Cineteca Nacional
Cineteca National Mexico – Cesar De La Rosa Anaya, Natali Riquelme Barrios

Since 2012 the Digital Film Restoration Lab at Mexico’s Cineteca Nacional has been rescuing some of the country’s nitrate film heritage. Their task of saving vintage Mexican films, from the earliest examples up until the 1980s, has posed a wide range of technical challenges including color grading, film deterioration and image unsteadiness. The ARRISCAN system has played a vital role, not just with scanning, but with the treatment of each individual frame of precious film stock, some of which is in a fragile or damaged condition.


The Nitrofilm project. Practical solutions for digitization and restauration of optical sound on nitrate film
Filmoteka Narodowa – Monika Supruniuk, Media Inventions – Jakub Stadnik

An overview of the audio restoration work carried out by the National Film Archive in Warsaw as part of a project to preserve the most important Polish pre-war films. The case study, The Two Joans (1935) will explain theoretical and aesthetical aspects of audio restoration, paying special attention to the concept of authenticity in audio restoration, and the workflow around the IMAGE TO SOUND TOOLS system.


Long-term digital preservation of audio-visual assets
Piql AS – Rune Bjerkestrand

Piql has developed technology for converting photo-sensitive silver halide film into a digital storage medium, for long term storage. After R&D projects lasting eight years, and costing 30 million euros, Piql have started to deploy their services of ultra-secure data storage and long-term digital preservation around the world.


The Lebanese war and the memory
MMK Trading / Notre Dame University – Marwan Kassis

A personal account of the storage and preservation of the rolls of film which represent an irreplaceable record of the history of Lebanon, and the wider middle east. Marwan Kassis describes this material as his region’s “memory”. The session will include descriptions and images of the condition of some of the 16 mm and 35 mm films, and look at the challenges faced by restorers and archivists working to very tight budgets.

BIOGRAPHIES

Cesar De La Rosa Anaya, is an expert in the digital restoration of silent nitrate films. He is an experienced operator of the ARRISCAN, including its Wetgate feature which helps to mask scratches, and its Sprocketless film transport feature. He has also collaborated in the research and documentation area of this laboratory’s work.

Natali Rashel Riquelme Barrios, spent three years researching, cataloging and physically repairing old and damaged film at the Filmoteca UNAM. For the past five years she has worked as a restorer and ARRISCAN operator at the Cineteca Nacional, where she is continuing her academic and technical studies.

Rune Bjerkestrand, has a background in cybernetics and business administration, and has been the major driving-force behind the development of Piql. With more than twenty years’ experience in the field of cybernetics, he has also worked in industrial design, from the conceptual phase through to implementation.

Lukasz Ceranka, started his career as an online artist, before joining the Chimney Pot Warsaw as a Digital Image specialist. There he took care of over 20 feature movies shot on film, before moving on to Yakumama, where he personally supervised digital restoration of nine feature films. In early 2012 he cofounded Fixafilm, where he still works.

Tonnie van Els, trained and worked as an audio engineer covering sporting events, after studying electronics he changed to studio work. He has been working in the field of audio-visual digitization and preservation with Sound and Vision for twenty years.

Gareth Evans, is a colourist and archivist based in Wellington, New Zealand, and trained at Peter Jackson's Park Road Post Production. He worked his way up to digital colorist, and assisted on films such as The Hobbit: Battle of Five Armies. Currently he works as a senior archivist at Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision, where he has helped preserve and restore some of New Zealand's oldest surviving films.

Paulo Veiga da Fonseca, began his career in film labs before moving into digitization and archiving. For the past eight years he has worked at the Netherlands institute for Sound and Vision, where he has been involved in digitizing around 10 000 hours of film material.

Franz Frank, worked at the Filmmuseum Düsseldorf in various roles, from projectionist to film archivist. He became involved with film digitization in 2015 and worked on restoration projects at the Murnau Stiftung, Wiesbaden. He is currently a film restorer and archivist at Deutsche Kinemathek, Berlin.

Prof. Dr. Barbara Flueckiger, is professor for film studies at the University of Zurich. With a background as a film professional, her research focuses on the interaction between technology and aesthetics. In 2015 she was awarded the prestigious Advanced Grant by the European Research Council for a research project on the technology and aesthetics of film colors. Website: zauberklang.ch

Marwan Kassis, is a film producer and director who devotes much of his time to the restoration and digital transfer of historic film stock and reel-to-reel audio tapes. He is head of the Lebanese Cinema Archives "Studio Baalbek" project, and general manager of MMK Trading-Side Effects Media Solutions.  

Matteo Lepore, is a film restoration supervisor at ARRI Media in Munich, having previously worked at Turin’s MNC and the Austrian Film Museum of Vienna. His role with ARRI has involved supervising projects carried out by the Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau Stiftung, the Deutsches Film Institut, the Reiner Werner Fassbinder Foundation, the Bundesarchiv Filmarchiv and the DEFA Stiftung.

Anke Mebold, is a film archivist, restorer and project manager at Deutsches Filminstitut in Frankfurt. Her main area of responsibility is film digitization and restoration. She holds a certificate in Film Preservation from the L. Jeffrey Selznick School at George Eastman House in Rochester, NY.

Daniel Meiler, has a background as a freelance film editor, and began film restoration work at the Nederlands Filmmuseum. He has been head of technical department of audiovisual collections at Deutsche Kinemathek since 2008.

Steffen Paul, is a dedicated colorist for ARRI Media in Berlin and works on television, cinema and film restoration projects. He previously worked as a video engineer in television, and holds a Diploma Degree from the University of Applied Sciences – Mittweida. He wrote his final thesis in affiliation with the Norwegian Color Research Laboratory at the Gjøvik University College.

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Ulrich Ruedel, is Professor of Conservation and Restoration at HTW Berlin, where he teaches and researches the preservation of film, photos, and video. He studied at the George Eastman Museum, and has worked for Haghefilm, and the British Film Institute.

Peter Schallauer, has been working with Joanneum Research since 1995. He has helped create innovative digital technologies and products in broadcast, archive and surveillance applications. This includes high quality digital film restoration (DIAMANT-Film), and video and film quality assessment tools.

Jakub Stadnik, is a sound engineer and a teacher at the Sound Engineering Department of the Fryderyk Chopin University of Music in Warsaw. He is a co-founder of Media Inventions, which developed IMAGE TO SOUND TOOLS to decode sound-on-films from high-resolution scans. He has so far restored audio for 15 pre-war feature films.

Monika Supruniuk, is a fine art conservator and restorer from the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw. Amongst other academic duties she works preserving film at the Filmoteka Narodowa (National Film Archive) in Warsaw.

Dr. Giorgio Trumpy, studied Conservation Science in Florence and received his PhD in Scientific Photography from the University of Basel. His work focuses on spectroscopy and imaging science for the conservation of cultural heritage. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Zurich, where he conducts scientific analysis of film color processes.

Anke Wilkening, is a film restorer and curator at the Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Stiftung in Wiesbaden. She supervised the restorations of Metropolis, Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari
and Münchhausen. Her published works concentrate on 1920s German cinema, film restoration and DVD editions. She is currently working on a PhD project on postproduction practices in silent film from the 1920s at the University of Utrecht.