Restoration experts attend ARRI workshop

On June 3rd and 4th 2014 the fifth annual ARRI Archive Workshop took place at ARRI's headquarters in Munich, attracting 145 international experts in the field of film archiving and restoration.

Year after year I discover new ways of attacking restoration challenges that we would have had no idea how to deal with only a few years ago.

Guest speakers gave presentations that addressed some of the pressing questions facing film restorers today, such as: how do you reproduce the appearance of early color film processes? How do you combine different source materials to get the 'truest' result? To what degree should original images be digitally 'improved'? How do you migrate and preserve legacy archives? What options are available for automated dust and scratch detection on black-and-white film material?

 

The workshop took place across two spaces at ARRI's headquarters, with an exhibition of the latest hardware and software solutions in an ARRI TV studio, and presentations in the ARRI cinema next door. Several of the guest speakers presented detailed case studies of some of the most important film restorations that have recently been undertaken across Europe, including director Robert Wiene's THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI (1920), Andrzej Wajda's THE ASHES (1965) and Captain John Noel's THE EPIC OF EVEREST (1924). 

Martin Körber, Head of Film Archive at the Deutsche Kinemathek, was in attendance and commented, "I find the ARRI Archive Workshop very rewarding because it enables us to show what we have done in partnership with ARRI, and keeps us up to date with what other archives and vendors are doing, especially how they apply new technologies to old problems. Year after year I discover new ways of attacking restoration challenges that we would have had no idea how to deal with only a few years ago. It is also nice to see the vendors and to keep up with what their latest gadgets are, affordable or not!"

I wanted to attend the ARRI Archive Workshop to be updated on what's going on in the field.

Another attendee was Tone Føreland of the National Library of Norway, who said, "I work as a film archivist with collection management, film preservation and quality control. I wanted to attend the ARRI Archive Workshop to be updated on what's going on in the field and to meet and talk to people to find out how others choose to solve their problems -- which in many cases are the same regardless of the specific institution."

 

Charlotte Quémy, Digital Restoration Manager at the Éclair Group's restoration facility in France, capable of handling more than 200 films per year, noted, "Again, I was very pleased to attend the annual ARRI workshop, which after its first couple of years became one of the key meeting places for international restoration people. I really appreciated the opportunity to meet with the software developers and I got fruitful answers to my technical questions. As always, the presentation sessions were very informative -- well prepared and illustrated; it's always interesting for me to learn more about restoration best practices."

Technologies on display at the ARRI Archive Workshop:

  • ARRISCAN archive options from ARRI
  • Phoenix, DVO and Bifrost from Digital Vision
  • OpenCube HD/SD Server from EVS
  • Silent Brick Library from FAST LTA
  • SAMMA and DIVArchive Solutions from Front Porch Digital
  • DIAMANT-Film Restoration from HS-Art
  • KEMSCAN from KEM Studiotechnik
  • Film Viewing Table FVT 600 HD from Kinoton Digital Solutions GmbH
  • Mist Master from Marquise Technologies
  • Nearline Storage from MatrixStore
  • SGI TrustedEdge, DMF, LiveArc, OmniStor from SGI
  • RESONANCES and ALTRA Mk3 from Sondor
  • PF Clean from The Pixel Farm